Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Pellicle

A pellicle mirror in a camera is a stationary one, replacing the flipping mirror in a SLR. The object of employing a pellicle mirror is to split the image forming light beam from the camera lens into two separate beams, one passing directly through it to the film or image sensor and the other one being redirected to the finder focusing screen; and in doing so, getting rid of the mirror movement mechanism. The consequence of splitting the light is reduced exposure light intensity and finder brightness. The usual intensity ratio is two to one in favour of the exposure, which works out to about 66% (⅓ stop loss) to the film or sensor and 33% (⅔ stop loss) to the finder.

GNU Free Documentation License 1.3

Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Kodak Advantix 3200AF

The Kodak Advantix 3200AF is a camera for the APS film format. It features autofocus, a tripod socket, and a self-timer. Like many of Kodak’s 1990s models, it has a flip-up flash. According to Kodak Classics, it was produced between 1996 and 1999.[1] It was made in Mexico.

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Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Williamson L-type camera

The Williamson L-type aerial camera is a 4×5-inch plate camera made for the Royal Flying Corps (predecessor of the Royal Air Force) during the First World War. It was patented by Major Frederic Laws of the RFC,[1]
and made by the Williamson Kinematograph Company of Denmark Street, London.[2] The wording of Laws’ patent suggests that this was a development of cameras already in use by the RFC.[1]

GNU Free Documentation License 1.3