Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Canon EOS 5

The Canon EOS 5 of 1992-2000 was an advanced 35mm film SLR. It was represented on the American market by the EOS A2E. Two major technological advances were introduced with this model: 5-point selectable autofocus, and eye-controlled focusing. During the long product cycle of this camera, a QD (Quartzdate) model was also available.

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Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Ernemann Kino I

As early as 1903 Ernemann introduced its amateur movie camera for 17.5mm middle-perforated cine film, the Ernemann Kino. Especially this handy movie camera made Ernemann popular in Germany since it was the beginning of amateur movie making in that country. The German word Kino for cinema has been derived from that camera type name.

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Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS62

The very compact Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS62 was sold since spring 2009. With its four-times zoom lens Leica DC Vario-Elmarit 1:2.8-5.9/5.5-22.0mm aspherical it covers a range from almost wide angle to long portrait focal length. At the beginning of 2010 it was the cheapest available camera with Leica lens – the cheapest “Leica”. Thus it’s no more available in the shops. It has a moderately good lens and especially a good scene program for snow.

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Camera Porn Wednesday

This weeks camera is:

Pellicle

A pellicle mirror in a camera is a stationary one, replacing the flipping mirror in a SLR. The object of employing a pellicle mirror is to split the image forming light beam from the camera lens into two separate beams, one passing directly through it to the film or image sensor and the other one being redirected to the finder focusing screen; and in doing so, getting rid of the mirror movement mechanism. The consequence of splitting the light is reduced exposure light intensity and finder brightness. The usual intensity ratio is two to one in favour of the exposure, which works out to about 66% (⅓ stop loss) to the film or sensor and 33% (⅔ stop loss) to the finder.

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